The Arts

lead-to-creativity

The arts were an important aspect of my childhood: if I wasn’t in band or reading, what would I be doing? I wasn’t good at math, and while science was interesting, I didn’t like dealing with numbers. Music has numbers too, but it’s not complex like measurements.

When I heard about public schools cutting the arts to pay more attention to exercise, I was disappointed. When my university football program made itself to be in dire need of funds and pushing humanities to the side, I was shocked. People give money to athletic programs, but the arts get left with nothing.

Why?

Now, Trump wants to eliminate the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and its sister agency National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). These are federally funded programs that have done so much for rural America, and saving lives through drawing, painting, reading, writing, music and theater.

I can’t explain the need for continued funding for the Arts in this post, but this article in Paste Magazine can, by looking at how low-income, at-risk children and war veterans will be affected by the proposed cut. And this article in Quartz, documenting how important the NEH is to America’s story.

Yes, we all need to know basic math. We need to embrace technology at work and learn how to use a computer and some software. We need to exercise and be healthy. But we also need to be creative and express who we are. You can’t express your feelings in a spreadsheet.

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Career Wednesday: Same story, Almost

journalism-for-blogging

Journalists are held to a high standard, and plagiarism is (or should) be on the top of the list of no-no’s. Reporters have gotten fired for plagiarizing their stories so it’s a big deal.

This morning I was reading 13 Things You Need to Know Before Visiting Dairy Queen. I was intrigued by item #4 and clicked on the first link, which took me to Dairy Queen’s New Blizzard Is Gonna Blow Your Mind. Both were fun (and yummy) reads.

However, I noticed two things about the articles:
1) The opening sentences are too similar and copy each other
2) Both compared the Royal Blizzards in a similar fashion (and linked) to Ben & Jerry’s cores ice cream: the links were named differently, but only one word was changed

In terms of competition–because every media outlet both online and on TV want to be the first to publish information first–it could be coincidence that the two articles are as such. Maybe the authors share a brain and came up with the same content, unbeknownst to each other? :/

I don’t know which annoys me more, the first item or second. I understand that bloggers read other blogs and link to each other in stories, but one couldn’t come up with a different opening sentence? (Ok I guess the first item annoys me more).

Writers, how do you make sure that you’re not plagiarizing your content? Am I completely wrong in comparing these two articles and citing one plagiarized the other? Let me know in the comments!

Food Friday: Fast Food Restaurants

burger

I just finished reading Bon Appetit’s list of the fast food chains that are going to be huge, and despite the comments, I like the selection. Granted that majority of the restaurants I’ve never heard of I think the list is pretty good. (FYI, out of the 32 places on the list, only five are in Hawaii!)

From the list, I LOVE Sonic, Five Guys, Panera Bread and Popeye’s. I want to try Shake Shack and Habit Burger Grill. Do you agree with the magazine’s list? What other fast food places do you think should have been included? Let me know in the comments!