Positive Feedback

I’ll tell friends good news when it happens, but I won’t go on and on about it. I’m not the bragging type, and take compliments with a bashful smile and “thank you.”

However, on the inside I feel empowered. Positive feedback makes me want to keep going, and get better at the task. The ones who gave me the praise will probably want to take back their comments if I messed up, right?

So, positive feedback can be good and bad, depending on how you look at it.

Don’t mind me. I’m rambling.

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I’m a Work in Progress

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lonerwolf.com

Since my mid-twenties came and went, I’ve always looked for ways to improve, whether personally or professionally. I did (and still do) look at others and wonder, ‘How is this person so smart about (insert topic here)?’ or ‘I want to be as good at (some task) as him/her, but how?’ Comparing myself to people who were successful and who seemed to “have it all,” I felt insecure, but took that as an opportunity to change and better myself.

My new journey began two-fold: I realized that all of the bookmarks on my computer were full of “fluff” websites: sites that didn’t enrich my life in any way, but were entertaining to read. I came to the conclusion that there was no real value to anything that I was reading on these sites. The second was graduating college and entering the real world, a world that none of us never fully grasp and understand. I wanted to be better at everything that I was doing, and to continue learning new things, but I didn’t know how.

That’s when Google became my helper. I typed in ‘self improvement sites’ and hit ‘Enter.’ That search led me to Lifehacker, Tiny Buddha, and Ted Talks (I’m sure you know about that last one, right??) A sidenote on Ted Talks: It’s a good site if you don’t want to read, but watch someone give advice. Amy Cuddy’s Your Body Language May Shape Who You Are is one of my favorites. I found that video when I was in the middle of a long, stressful, and (oftentimes) frustrating job search. It helped me be more confident in interviews, and I believe that her advice is what landed me my current position as an agent assistant.

You never know what can happen to you if you practice what you learn.

But over the years my list of self-improvement sites changed, and recently I added a new one called Smarter Living, a newish section of The New York Times that’s full of practical articles in addition to more in-depth stories. The section is dedicated to helping readers live better lives, and if you have an open mind, you’ll find this site useful. I happen to like their Guides.

After reading a few articles, I signed up for the Smarter Living newsletter. Now I get useful information delivered to my email every week. I’m not a subscriber to The Times, so I’m still only allowed to read 9 articles a month, but I haven’t ruled out the option of doing so. It’s another valuable site that I’m grateful to have stumbled upon.

Growing and bettering yourself is what everyone should strive to do every day of their lives. But some people are fine with staying static. I hope that you don’t want that for yourself. Whether it’s learning how to cook better, or how to be a better employee, there are a lot of resources on the web waiting to be read and put into practice. It’s working for me, and it’ll work for you too.

What websites do you go on for advice and to better yourself?

I Want Attention!

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The newest issue of WIRED Magazine caught my attention. I had never read their publication, but the headline about pain piqued my curiosity. I noted the key words on the cover so I could find the article and read it later.
It was an interesting piece, but afterward I found other articles on their site worth reading. I felt tempted to email the site to myself and bookmark it. That’s what I do when I find a site that has good content.
 
And there lies my (our) problem: over consumption.
 
It’s my inattentiveness or curiosity but I read a lot of articles on various websites. My bookmarks tab has food sites, music sites and lots of articles. Sometimes I tend to stay on one site and read whatever looks appealing. After doing that time has flown by!
 
But spending my time on the internet like this is not good for my stress level. I say stress because I look at my bookmarks and start to feel anxious. It’s a lot of information saved for later.
 
But here’s the real problem: So many publications are covering the same topics. So the questions become, which site do we go to for news? Which publication is best for business? Every website is competing for your attention, but how do they get you to ONLY go to their site and trust them? Do you choose the all-inclusive site like The New York Times, or a specialty one to read about science? And if you do the latter, what makes you choose Scientific American over NPR? Or do you read both?
 
How do we choose where to focus our reading on topics that interest us? What makes a website good enough for us to keep going back to it? I wrestle with the answers to these questions whenever I catch myself spending a few minutes too long on a website.
 
The internet can be a great learning tool, no doubt. (And a distraction!) Google can find anything you’re looking for in a second. But whose information do you trust?
This reminds me, I should clean up my bookmarks.

Inspiring Talks

Once in a while I watch Ted Talks. And they can’t come at a better time for me: when I’m down, there’s always a video of theirs that brings me back to normal. Through Youtube or their website, I enjoy them. And it’s easy to lose track of time, especially if you watch the videos that are more than 15 minutes long.

These videos are inspiring and thought provoking. There are multiple videos on the same topic so they can be repetive, but there are standouts among the pile. You can learn a lot about yourself, others and life through them.

I watched Amy Cudy’s video on body language to prep for a job interview, and her points worked. I felt relaxed and confident during the ordeal. I didn’t get the job but that’s one example on how Ted Talks helped me.

If you don’t like watching videos, the the Ted Blog is stocked with posts that are just as motivational and intriguing as their counterpart. Whatever medium you choose, you will not be let down.