Diary Writing

diary
http://www.penguin.co.uk

I watched a cute and funny video on The Atlantic about David Sedaris and him keeping a diary in today’s age.

I have half a bookshelf filled with my diaries, which I began keeping in 97/98. Every notebook is filled with my experiences growing up. It was how I released emotion. I wasn’t one to talk about my feelings (still learning to do that), but I didn’t want someone to talk back to me and give advice. I yearned for someone who would just shut up and listen. I found that “person” in notebooks. I wasn’t judged, and I felt free to write about anything I wanted.

But as I continued writing in my adult life, the entries weren’t imaginative anymore. They became sounding boards for the frustrations I was encountering. And the positive. The log time between entries grew too–I wasn’t writing as often. As the saying goes, “Life got in the way.”

However, watching this video made me proud to be a diary keeper and not an oversharer online: you know the person on Facebook who shares everything from health issues to photos of their children to relationship woes. Isn’t it tiring to see that? Where’s the discrection? If you share your life with the world, what do you have to hold onto? Your Facebook feed becomes your diary, when a diary is supposed to be private. As Sedaris said, “More people are documenting their lives now. The difference is the degree to which they’re sharing. And there’s a lot to be said for not putting things out there.”

Like handwritten letters, keeping a diary is old school. But putting pen to paper is intimate. Note taking doesn’t count here. Anyone can do that (and required for class!). However, writing a letter or your thoughts out takes effort. There’s no delete key, and the handwriting isn’t going to be legible to everyone who reads it. If you make a mistake, scratch it out or white it out. Or throw it out and start over.

While the computer’s great (Microsoft Office!), keeping a diary is still valued today. I won’t stop doing it.

Advertisements