Camping

I went on my first camping trip over Memorial Day weekend. Four of us went to Keaiwa Heiau State Recreation Area and it was fun!

Since it was a weekend to unplug and be with nature, I didn’t take a lot of photos, but there was no need to. It was great making memories without photos.

Keaiwa Heiau State Recreation Area houses Aiea Loop Trail, with ten campsites scattered around the park. Some campsites had amenities such as bathrooms and showers, while others had nothing but greenery. Thankfully, we had the former, and our site was at the end of the trail.

Tent
Our tent

We arrived Saturday afternoon and spent the next 48 hours eating good food (someone ate more s’mores than I can count), relaxing, getting rained on (twice) and one Target trip (Sunday).

There were seven designated areas on the campsite, each having at least one picnic table. I was wondering how many people were going to there and it was quite a bit! The largest group had the prime spot, where they set up a covering and a large fire. It was populated, but the campsite was large so no one was invading another group’s space. I liked that there were a lot of people around.

Some of them made us laugh. Like group grilling over the sewer line. (Actually, that just made us concerned).

But, it was a sight.

During the day it was hot, but at night I needed to wear a jacket. In fact, I wore my jacket over my long-sleeve PJ’s.

Despite the cold, we saw the stars, and they were beautiful.

Smores
The…fifth, fourth time making s’mores?

Because of the rain early Sunday morning, it was too muddy to hike the trail. However, the four of us got our exercise walking to the entrance of the trail head looking for dill. (A friend and I went on a walk Saturday night and smelled it, so we brought the guys to explore but the smell was gone! They thought we were crazy).

Even though camping was fun, I was SO ready to go home and SHOWER. I think we all were. Two days in the “wilderness” was enough for me. I joked that camping was going to be a once a year affair. I’m not that much of an outdoorsy person, but wanted to try camping.

And my OCD was (mostly) kept in check. I was hesitant to go camping because of that, but I decided that I wasn’t going to let it prevent me from doing things.

And I didn’t.

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Making Bread

My boyfriend, Matt, enjoys making bread. Dinner rolls, danishes, loaves filled with herbs. He’s a bread making machine! I never wanted to try baking some myself because of the kneading process. I was lazy.

That changed when I found Alexandra Stafford’s no-knead peasant bread. I read the recipe and figured it was simple, so I made it on a Saturday where I didn’t have any plans. (That’s rare, by the way).

Unfortunately, I didn’t take photos of the baking process, but it came together fast! It was mixed by hand with a spatula: no stand mixer needed. And you only need one bowl to mix the ingredients, how great is that?

However, even with the quick prep, the dough still needed to rise for a total of…okay, so the first rise is 1-1/1/2 hours and the second rise is 10-20 minutes. I let it rise for 1/1/2 hours, then 20 minutes, so you do the math for me. Haha!!

After the first rise, I formed the mass of dough into a ball, divided in half, and placed each half into two (different sized) bowls using forks. The transfer of the balls with forks resulted in the dough coming apart. I wasn’t sure why the directions called for forks, but I assumed it was to keep my hands from getting messy (if that was the case, the directions said that if the dough came apart during transferring, to use your hands. Contradiction).

Because my bowls were different sizes, that affected how the dough rose the second time. The dough ball in the small bowl became huge while the ball in the large bowl didn’t look too big.

The differences in bowl sizes also affected their baking time. The one in the small bowl was done in 20 minutes while the other took longer.

Now, as I mentioned, it was my first time baking bread. I didn’t know when it was fully baked, even though I ate it all the time. I’ve eaten (and seen) soft, white bread, brown bread, wheat bread…but baking loaves myself made me wonder, ‘Is it done? How do I know?’

loaves

The loaves came out decent. The outside was crunchy and the inside was really buttery (because of the greasing of the bowls) and soft, a little too soft. Not doughy. According to Matt, it was a little undercooked.

I trust him.

insideofbread

Even with that knowledge, I was proud of myself for making my first bread! I will be making it again.

But I better buy two same size bowls first.

I Want Attention!

fd-17-internet
The newest issue of WIRED Magazine caught my attention. I had never read their publication, but the headline about pain piqued my curiosity. I noted the key words on the cover so I could find the article and read it later.
It was an interesting piece, but afterward I found other articles on their site worth reading. I felt tempted to email the site to myself and bookmark it. That’s what I do when I find a site that has good content.
 
And there lies my (our) problem: over consumption.
 
It’s my inattentiveness or curiosity but I read a lot of articles on various websites. My bookmarks tab has food sites, music sites and lots of articles. Sometimes I tend to stay on one site and read whatever looks appealing. After doing that time has flown by!
 
But spending my time on the internet like this is not good for my stress level. I say stress because I look at my bookmarks and start to feel anxious. It’s a lot of information saved for later.
 
But here’s the real problem: So many publications are covering the same topics. So the questions become, which site do we go to for news? Which publication is best for business? Every website is competing for your attention, but how do they get you to ONLY go to their site and trust them? Do you choose the all-inclusive site like The New York Times, or a specialty one to read about science? And if you do the latter, what makes you choose Scientific American over NPR? Or do you read both?
 
How do we choose where to focus our reading on topics that interest us? What makes a website good enough for us to keep going back to it? I wrestle with the answers to these questions whenever I catch myself spending a few minutes too long on a website.
 
The internet can be a great learning tool, no doubt. (And a distraction!) Google can find anything you’re looking for in a second. But whose information do you trust?
This reminds me, I should clean up my bookmarks.